A Direct Manipulation Interface
for Frame-Accurate In-Scene Video Navigation


What is DRAGON?


DRAGON is a direct-manipulation interaction technique for frame-accurate navigation in video scenes. This technique benefits tasks such as professional and amateur video editing, review of sports footage, and forensic analysis of video scenes.

By directly dragging objects in the scene along their movement trajectory, DRAGON enables users to quickly and precisely navigate to a specific point in the video timeline where an object of interest is in a desired location. Examples include the specific frame where a sprinter crosses the finish line, or where a car passes a traffic light.

Through a user study, we have shown that DRAGON significantly reduces task completion time for in-scene navigation tasks by an average of 19–42% compared to a standard timeline slider. Qualitative feedback from users is also positive, with multiple users indicating that the DRAGON interaction felt more natural than the traditional slider for in-scene navigation.

The People Behind DRAGON


DRAGON is a research project by Thorsten Karrer, Malte Weiss, Moritz Wittenhagen, Jan Borchers and others at the Media Computing Group. It is funded in part through the German B-IT Foundation and the UMIC DFG Excellence Initiative.


PocketDRAGON is an implementation of the DRAGON technique for the iPhone. It helps to navigate videos without requiring any valuable screen real estate on the mobile device.
DRAGONEye is a high-performance implementation of the DRAGON technique. It does not require any pre-processing time and is more robust against object occlusions at the same time.

Awards


Our CHI 2008 Note (see below) received a CHI Best Note Award.

Downloads

Software

Video Overview


Publications

2012

Andreas Nett. Finding Cognitive Strategies for Navigating with 1D-Controls. Diploma thesis, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, November 2012. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.
Benjamin Walther-Franks, Marc Herrlich, Thorsten Karrer, Moritz Wittenhagen, Roland Schröder-Kroll, Rainer Malaka, and Jan Borchers. Dragimation: Direct Manipulation Keyframe Timing for Performance-based Animation. In GI '12: Proceedings of the 2012 Graphics Interface Conference, pages 101–108, Toronto, Ont., Canada, Canada, May 2012. Homepage BibTeX Entry.
Thorsten Karrer, Moritz Wittenhagen, and Jan Borchers. DragLocks: Handling Temporal Ambiguities in Direct Manipulation Video Navigation. In CHI '12: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, May 2012. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.
Alisa Novosad. Object Selection and Adaptive Trajectories in DRAGON. Master's thesis, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, February 2012. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.

2011

Anne Kathrein. Event Detection in Videos based on Object Trajectories. Bachelor's thesis, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, September 2011. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.

2009

Thorsten Karrer, Moritz Wittenhagen, and Jan Borchers. PocketDRAGON: a direct manipulation video navigation interface for mobile devices. In MobileHCI '09: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, pages 47:1–47:3. ACM, September 2009. BibTeX Entry.
Christian Brockly. Evaluation of direct manipulation techniques for in-scene video navigation. Diploma thesis, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, February 2009. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.

2008

Moritz Wittenhagen. DragonEye—Fast Object Tracking and Camera Motion Estimation. Master's thesis, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, October 2008. PDF Document BibTeX Entry.
Thorsten Karrer, Malte Weiss, Eric Lee, and Jan Borchers. DRAGON: A Direct Manipulation Interface for Frame-Accurate In-Scene Video Navigation. In CHI '08: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pages 247–250, Florence, Italy, April 2008. ACM Press. Best CHI 2008 Note Award, PDF Document Movie BibTeX Entry.




Created by borchers. Last Modification: Monday 01 of February, 2010 11:53:26 by jon.

Media Computing Group at RWTH Aachen

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